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2010-2011 Annual Report

http://daas.duable.us/

Table of Contents

About African American Studies

Programs of Study

Courses

Faculty and Staff

About African American Studies

The Department of African American Studies strives to enrich the lives of individuals and transform society through the creation of new knowledge about the experiences, perspectives, and interests of African descended people. We are committed to sharing this knowledge through teaching, public programming, and outreach.

Students will be trained and encouraged to join a new generation of leaders promoting social justice through public engagement, service, and policy making.
Programs of Study

Undergraduate Major in African American Studies
This is the foundational undergraduate degree of the Department of African American Studies (DAAS). The central objective of the major in African American Studies (AAS) is to provide students with a transdiciplinary perspective on the origin, role and policy implications of race in the United States and world political economy, society and culture, over time. An African American Studies major will be encouraged to achieve excellence in developing vital creative and critical competencies, including oral and written communication, computer and statistical skills.

This program is designed to serve undergraduate students primarily interested in the social sciences and humanities, though all students are welcome and encouraged to enroll in the program. This program prepares students for graduate study and research in traditional disciplines and interdisciplinary fields and for careers in the private or public sectors such as teaching, social work, human resources, criminal justice, management and administration, city planning, marketing, policy-making, medicine and law.

REQUIREMENTS

Hours
Requirements
12
I. Core Course Requirements
AFRO 100: Intro to African American Studies
AFRO 220: Intro to Research Methods in African American Studies
AFRO 490: Theory in African American Studies
AFRO 495: Senior Thesis Seminar
6
II. Theory Requirement
At least one theory and one methods course beyond the core. This course must be selected from a list maintained in the Department’s advising office.
21
III. Thematic Areas
Students must take at least one course each from the following five areas. At least 6 of the remaining hours must be taken from only one of any of the five areas. A list of courses is maintained in the Department’s advising office.
A) Comparative Race, Racialized Communities and Identities
B) Cultural Production and Cultural Movements
C) Political Economy, Public Policy and Contemporary Issues
D) Global Interconnections: Black Transnationalism and the African Diaspora
E) Black Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
9
IV. Cognate or Supporting Coursework
Students must complete 9 hours of supporting coursework. Supporting coursework courses consists of a set of courses which are logically grouped, and which reflect or support a student’s interests outside of the African American Studies major. Supporting coursework courses must be approved by the Department’s undergraduate advisor.
48
Total Required Hours
Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Minor in African American Studies
The Department of African American Studies (DAAS) offers a campus-wide interdisciplinary minor in African-American Studies. DAAS’s minor is premised on the following principles: Interdisciplinary, the centrality of Black women and gender, the use of the Global Africa/African Diaspora as a contextualizing framework and an emphasis on black agency or the self-activity of African peoples.

REQUIREMENTS

Hours
Requirements

I. Core course requirements
3
AFRO 100 – Intro to Afro-American Studies
3
AFRO 490 – Africana Theories or AFRO 220 - Intro to Research Methods
3
AFRO 495 - Senior Thesis Seminar

II. Areas of Concentration
3-4
A. Comparative Race, Racialized Communities and Identities
Students must take at least one course in this area. Students may choose courses
from a list in the DAAS office.
3-4
B. Cultural Production and Cultural Movements
Students must take at least one course in this area. Students may choose courses
from a list in the DAAS office.
3-4
C. Political Economy, Public Policy and Contemporary Issues
Students must take at least one course in this area. Students may choose courses
from a list in the DAAS office.
3
Elective in any of the above areas
21
Total

Students must not take more than 6 hours of 100-level courses. A minimum of 6 hours of
300- and 400-level courses is required. At least one course in the minor must focus on Black Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Graduate Minor and Graduate Concentration in African American Studies
The interdisciplinary Graduate Minor in African American Studies is designed to explore a wide range of information and scholarship in African American studies and its subfields.  African American Studies at Illinois emphasizes historically specific critical analyses of black racial formation, the particular experiences of Black women, gender construction, and African American agency, in the context of constantly evolving political economies, governmental policies, and popular culture. 

REQUIREMENTS

The Department of African American Studies offers a Graduate Minor (12 graduate hours) for any graduate student enrolled at UIUC, but preferably in the social sciences or humanities, and who demonstrates an interest in African American Studies.

Hours
Requirements
4
AFRO 500, Core Problems in African-American Studies.
8
Graduate courses from an approved list of African American Studies courses, at least one of which must be at the 500-level.
12
Total

The Department of African American Studies offers a Graduate Concentration (24 graduate hours) for any graduate student enrolled at UIUC in History, Educational Psychology, Educational Policy Studies, African Studies, Sociology, or Political Science, and who demonstrates an interest in African American Studies.

Hours
Requirements
12
AFRO 500, Core Problems in African-American Studies
AFRO 597, Problems in African-American Studies
AFRO 598, Res Seminar in African-American Studies
12
Graduate courses from an approved list of African American Studies courses, at least two of which must be at the 500-level.
24
Total

Courses

AFRO 100
Introduction to African American Studies
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a UIUC Social Sciences, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered by African American studies; surveys the major approaches to the study of African Americans across several academic disciplines including economics, education, psychology, literature, political science, sociology and others.

AFRO 101
Black America, 1619-Present
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist & Philosoph Perspect, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as HIST 174) AFRO 101 surveys the African American experience from the West African background to contemporary times. The course traces the lived experiences of African Americans. It examines why and how African peoples were incorporated into the United States of America. It examines the formation of slavery and subsequent systems of racial oppression. This course provides a materialist framework for understanding the dialectical relationship between changing structures of U.S. capitalist political economy, the structures and ideologies of racial oppression, and the self‑emancipatory practices of African American people. It delineates the elements of racial oppression, including both its structural and ideological apparatuses and offers a conceptualization of the periods and stages of African American historical development. AFRO 101 explores the processes by which diverse African ethnicities transformed themselves into one people, African Americans and created and maintained a distinct culture. The course explores the forces that both unify and fragment African American people. Consequently, much attention is given to black women and questions of gender; black workers and issues of class; and youth and generational conflict. Furthermore, this will examine the nationalist and radical wings of the Black Freedom Movement as well as the traditional liberal organizations.

AFRO 102
Researching the African American Experience
3 hours
AFRO 102 will focus on research and documentation of the African American experience. It acknowledges the associations of influential bibliophiles and the impact of their activities on the preservation and establishment of unique and rare collections of African American literature and history.

AFRO 103
Black Women in the Diaspora
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as AFST 103 and GWS 103) Explores the historical, social, economic, cultural and political realities of black women in the African diaspora with an emphasis on the U.S., Canada, Britain, Africa and the English speaking Caribbean. How macro structures such as slavery, imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, and globalization shaped and continue to circumscribe the lives of black women across various geographic regions. Discussion of the multiple strategies/efforts that black women employ both in the past and present to ensure the survival of the self and the community.
AFRO 105
Black Literature in America
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Literature and the Arts, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as ENGL 150) Survey of the literary work of Black Americans from 1746 to the present. Exploration of the social, cultural, and political contexts that have shaped the Black American literary tradition by analyzing not only poetry, drama, autobiographical narratives, short stories, and novels, but also folktales, spirituals, and contemporary music.

AFRO 199
Independent Study
1-5 hours
To register in this section, students should contact the instructor who will supervise their work.

AFRO 199
Undergraduate Open Seminar
1-5 hours
Contact instructor or department office for information on sections being offered each semester. May be repeated.

AFRO 220
Intro to Research Methods African American Studies
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100
This course will introduce students to various methodologies to be employed in the interdisciplinary field of African American/Africana studies. Access to a personal computer and SPSS software is required.
AFRO 23
AFRO 224
Humanist Perspectives of the Afro-American Experience
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or consent of instructor
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Literature and the Arts, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as CWL 226) Presents the Afro-centric world view as it was manifested in traditional African society and in the Afro-American slave community. Shows that this world view merged with European notions of art and humanity, as revealed in modern Afro-American literature, art, and music. Approved for both letter and S/U grading.

AFRO 226
Black Women in Contemporary US Society
3 hours
(Same as GWS 226 and SOC 223) This course will offer a sociological perspective of the experiences of African American women in the contemporary United States. Specifically, an examination of relationships between the economy, state policy, culture, work and motherhood for this demographic group.

AFRO 231
Language Difference Discussion: American Perspective
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as SHS 231) Discusses the interaction of culture, ethnicity/race and language among American minorities. Emphasizes language difference theory as related to social and regional dialects and bilingualism/multilingualism. Distinguishes language differences from language disorders through examination of assessment and treatment approaches for different aged populations.

AFRO 261
Introduction to the African Diaspora
3 hours
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist & Philosoph Perspect, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as ANTH 261) Introduction to the origin, development, and maturation of the African diaspora in the Americas and the Caribbean, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade and up to the end of the 20th century.

AFRO 290
African American Urban History Since 1917
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 101, HIST 276, HIST 172, SOC, 225, or PS 201
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a Hist & Philosoph Perspect, and US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as HIST 284) Examination of the changing interaction among black urban communities, the broader urban citizenry, municipal government, the local and national urban-industrial economy, and federal policy over time, giving particular attention to discourses about the black "ghetto" as both a physical space and set of social conditions.

AFRO 298
Special Topics in African American Studies
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or AFRO 101, or consent of instructor.
Seminar on selected topics with particular emphasis on current research trends. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

AFRO 342
Black Men and Masculinities
3 hours
Prerequisite: Introductory social science course
(Same as SOC 325) The sociological study of African American men in the contemporary U.S. Specifically, black manhood and masculinities and the experiences of this demographic group as it relates to the economy, state, policy, and institutions such as family, criminal justice system, and education.

AFRO 372
Class Politics and Black Community
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 101, HIST 276, or SOC 225 or consent of instructor
(Same as HIST 384) Exploration of the complex history of class relations among African Americans during the twentieth century, examining both the internal and external shapers of black class stratification. Considers the historical development of contemporary black "underclass", and the parallel expansion of the black middle class today.

AFRO 373
African American Culture and Politics in Mid-Twentieth Century
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 and AFRO 101, AFRO 261, ENGL 260 or HIST 276
Focusing on African American culture and history from World War II until the early 1960's, topics include citizenship, migration, urban life, the African Diaspora, Civil Rights Movement, and art forms. Approved for both letter and S/U grading.

AFRO 378
Race and Revolutions
3 hours
Prerequisite: One AFRO or HIST course at either the 100- or 200-level or the consent of instructor
(Same as HIST 389) Focus on the relationship between race and slavery during the revolutions in American and Haiti, respectively. We will seek to understand how the themes of slavery, revolution and race affected blacks, whites and indigenous Americans. We will learn about life during the Revolutionary era by reading the biographies, political pamphlets and personal letters of former slaves, Revolutionaries and everyday men and women as well as historical scholarship.

AFRO 381
Black Women and Film
3 hours
Prerequisite: College level film course or consent of instructor
(Same as CINE 381) An examination of the contribution of Black women film directors to cinema. The study of documentary, experimental, animated, fictional shorts, and feature films will reveal their unique approach to constructions of the intersection of race and gender. Starting from the 1920's up to the present, the course considers themes, aesthetics, historical contexts, and ideological discourses presented in the films.

AFRO 382
African American Families in Film
3 hours
(Same as HDFS 324) Uses films as case studies to examine the diverse structures, social classes, and internal dynamics among African American families. Critical family processes such as family formation patterns, dating/mate selection, parenting, male-female/gender relations, child adolescent, and adult development, family routines and practices, family communication, and family stress and coping will be examined. We also consider how families interact within larger contexts, such as the local neighborhood and key institutions (schools, workplace, social service agencies). Films will be supplemented with readings drawn from diverse disciplines (African American Studies, Anthropology, Family Studies, History, Psychology, and Sociology) that allow us to examine key substantive, theoretical, methodological, and policy issues in the study of African American families.

AFRO 383
History of Black Women’s Activism
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or AFRO 101 or AFRO 103 or consent of instructor
(Same as GWS 383 and HIST 383) Examination of the history of twentieth century black women's activism, specifically concerned with how African American female activists have been critical to building, sustaining and leading black freedom movements.

AFRO 398
Independent Study
3 hours
To register in this section, students should contact the instructor who will supervise their work.

AFRO 398
Special Topics in African American Studies
3 hours
Contact instructor or department office for information on sections being offered each semester.

AFRO 400
African Diasporic Literature in Americas
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 224 or AFRO 259 or AFRO 260 or consent of instructor
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a US Minority Culture(s) course.
(Same as CWL 400) Critical examination of the contributions of writers of African descent from the Caribbean (English, French, Spanish) and the United States. Major works of fiction, poetry, drama and essays from Cuba, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Haiti, St. Lucia, the United States and other countries are analyzed within a post-colonial theoretical framework. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 410
Hate Crimes
3 hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 or AFRO 344 or consent of instructor
(Same as PSYC 410) Hate crimes represent the manifestation of intergroup bias and aggression. Examples of these crimes will be examined while analyzing longstanding theories in social psychology.

AFRO 411
African American Psychology
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or one psychology course
(Same as PSYC 416) Introduction to the research, theories, and paradigms developed to understand the attitudes, behaviors, and psychological and educational realities of African Americans. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 415
Africana Feminisms
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 103 and an additional 300 or 400-level AFRO course or consent of the instructor
(Same as AFST 420 and GWS 415) Explores readings and research from the perspective of feminists throughout the African diaspora, with a focus on Black feminist thought emanating from the United States. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 453
Plantation Societies in the Americas
3 hours or 4 hours
Prerequisite: A survey course in early United States history and/or western civilization; junior status, or consent of the instructor
(Same as HIST 470) Comparative and interdisciplinary approach to study of the development of New World societies with focus on plantation agriculture from the 15th to 19th centuries. Course considers Portuguese, Spanish, British, French, and Dutch colonization. Students will study the relative importance of culture versus economy and demography in determining social structure. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 460
Slavery in the United States
2 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or AFRO 101 and one 300-level AFRO course
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for an Advanced Composition course.
(Same as HIST 482) Examination of slavery in the U.S. using primary sources (slave narratives, songs and tales, plantation records, laws and newspapers) from the 18th century through emancipation. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 466
Race and Science
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 or AFRO 101 and one 300-level AFRO course
(Same as HIST 483) Examination of the historical development of scientific theories of race, focusing on biology, anthropology, mind sciences and modern genetics. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 474
Black Freedom Movement, 1955-Present
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 101, HIST 276, or consent of instructor
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for an Advanced Composition course.
(Same as HIST 478) Presents the struggle of African Americans for self-definition, self-development, and self-determination from the inception of the civil rights movement to the contemporary period. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 490
Theory in African American Studies
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 and one additional 400-level AFRO course, or consent of instructor
Introduction to various theories and methodologies rising out of the study of the Black world based on African American intellectual traditions. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 491
Methodology in African American Studies
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 and AFRO 220 and an additional 300 or 400-level African American Studies course or consent of instructor
Introduction to various methodologies to be employed in the interdisciplinary field of African American/Africana studies. Access to personal computer SPSS software is required. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours.

AFRO 495
Senior Thesis Seminar
3 hours
Prerequisite: AFRO 100 and AFRO 220 or AFRO 490
The purpose of this course is for students to demonstrate their competence in African American Studies by writing a senior thesis, which will synthesize Black Studies’ concepts, theories, and medthodologies. Students will investigate the role of race in research, examine the activitist-intellectual tradition within Africana Studies, investigate the historical development of the Black intellectual tradition, and produce an original work of scholarship or artistic production.

AFRO 498
Special Topics in African American Studies
3 or 4 hours
Prerequisite: Upper level AFRO course (300 or above) or consent of instructor
Seminar on selected topics with particular emphasis on current research trends. 3 undergraduate hours, 4 graduate hours. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours or 8 graduate hours.

AFRO 500
Core Problems in African American Studies
4 hours
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Introduction for graduate students to the central concepts, theories, methodologies, and paradigms in Black Studies. Students will also be introduced to the key critical scholars, seminal works and emerging trends in Black Studies.

AFRO 502
Research Methods on Racial Community
4 hours
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
A critical examination of social scientific approaches to the study of black and other racialized communities. Students are introduced to the methodological, epistemological, and ethical challenges of doing social science and humanities research on these populations

AFRO 503
Social Movements and Knowledge Production
4 hours
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
Analysis of the literature of Black and Latino radical social movements of the 1960s, and the history of anti-racists campaigns to transform the key social and political institutions, including the university. The use of Black and Latino research and scholarship to reconfigure history of racialized communities. The relationship between university sanctioned knowledge and community empowerment.

AFRO 504
Black Women’s Studies
4 hours
The study of black women and gender within critical discourses of history, the social sciences, and the humanities. Students are introduced to interdisciplinary and Black Women’s Studies paradigms as means to study and understand the experiences of black women in the U.S. and other racialized women’s groups.

AFRO 505
Proseminar I
1 hour
Prerequisite: Doctoral student in African American Studies.
Provides PhD students in African American Studies a review of the responsibilities of professional African American Studies scholars. This part introduces students to current debates and issues in the discipline, program requirements and expectations. Approved for S/U grading only.

AFRO 506
Proseminar II
1 hour
Prerequisite: AFRO 505 or consent of advisor and instructor.
The second of three proseminars for PhD students in African American Studies. Provides students with a review of the responsibilities of professional African American Studies scholars and emphasizes processes of Master Paper development, writing, and conference presentations. Approved for S/U grading only.

AFRO 507
Proseminar III
1 hour
Prerequisite: AFRO 506 or consent of advisor and instructor.
The final of three proseminars, this course provides students with a review of the responsibilities of professional African American Studies scholars and emphasizes issues of pedagogy, research, and publication in the discipline of African American Studies.

AFRO 508
Dissertation Design Practicum
1 hour
Prerequisite: Completion of African American Studies PhD coursework and Proseminar series.
Facilitate the development of dissertation proposals for PhD students in African American Studies. Approved for S/U grading only.

AFRO 550
Black Community and Class Politics
4 hours
Exploration of the complex history of class relations within African American urban communities during the "long" twentieth century, and the relationship of these internal dynamics to external structures of racial control. Examination of the multiple processes through which both the urban black working class and a middle class formed, and were transformed, over time.

AFRO 552
Ethnography of Urban Communities
4 hours
(Same as HCD 543 and SOC 578) Addresses substantive, theoretical, methodological, and policy issues within the field of urban community studies. Focusing primarily on African American urban communities, with comparisons to other racial-ethnic group communities (e.g. Euro-American, Latino, migrant), ethnographic case studies are used to explore community processes (formation, ghettoization, gentrification, transnationalism), their relationship to historical, economic, social, and political factors, and how these processes are influenced by ethnicity, class, gender and development cycle. Attention will also be given to how empirical studies can be used to inform public policies affecting urban communities. Interdisciplinary readings draw primarily from anthropology, education, and sociology.

AFRO 560
African Diaspora Seminar
4 hours
(Same as AFST 560) Study of the key political, social, economic and cultural developments of the African Diaspora in Asia, Europe and the Americas. Using an interdisciplinary framework, students will examine recent scholarship in history, women's studies, political science, sociology and anthropology to understand the experiences and challenges faced by people of African descent.

AFRO 595
Directed Independent Readings
1-4 hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Primarily but not exclusively for students who are completing a minor or concentration in African American Studies. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours.

AFRO 597
Problems in African American Studies
4 hours
Prerequisite: Graduate standing, AFRO 500 or equivalent, or consent of instructor
Focused reading and study of special problems in African American Studies. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

AFRO 598
Research Seminar in African American Studies
4 hours
Prerequisite: Graduate standing, AFRO 500 or equivalent, or consent of instructor
Graduate seminar on special topics based on current research trends. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

AFRO 599
Thesis Research
0-16 hours
Individual direction in research and guidance in writing theses and dissertations for advanced degrees. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms.

 

Faculty and Staff

Faculty

Abdul Alkalimat
Professor
African American Studies, Graduate School of Library & Information Science
Research areas: Community informatics; African American intellectual history
mcworter@illinois.edu

Christopher Benson
Associate Professor
African American Studies, Journalism
Research areas: Race and the press; hate crimes
cdbenson@illinois.edu

Sundiata Cha-Jua
Associate Professor
African American Studies, History
Research areas: Black radicalism and nationalism; community formation
schajua@illinois.edu

Karen Flynn
Assistant Professor
African American Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies
Research areas: Women; racism; feminist and critical anti-racist theory
kcflynn@illinois.edu

Jennifer Hamer
Associate Professor
African American Studies, Sociology
Research areas: African American fathers, mothers, and families in the U.S.
jhamer@illinois.edu

Ronald Jackson
Professor and Department Head
African American Studies, Institute for Communication Research
Research areas: Media, race and identity; interracial communication
identity@illinois.edu

Robin Jarrett
Professor
African American Studies, Human and Community Development
Research areas: Low-income African American families in inner-city areas
rjarrett@illinois.edu

Clarence Lang
Associate Professor
African American Studies, History
Research areas: African American history; modern U.S. history; labor history
celang@illinois.edu

Erik McDuffie
Assistant Professor
African American Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies
Research areas: African American women’s activism; Black feminism
emcduffi@illinois.edu

Ruby Mendenhall
Assistant Professor
African American Studies, Sociology
Research areas: Race and housing; economic mobility; public policy; families
rubymen@illinois.edu

Ray Muhammad
Assistant Professor
African American Studies, Sociology
Research areas: Sociology of the family; fatherhood; quantitative methods
rmuhamma@illinois.edu

H. Adlai Murdoch
Associate Professor
African American Studies, French
Research areas: Cross-cultural issues of postcolonialism and diaspora
hmurdoch@illinois.edu

Helen Neville
Professor
African American Studies, Educational Psychology
Research areas: Stress and coping processes of African Americans; racial ideologies
hneville@illinois.edu

Brendesha Tynes
Assistant Professor
African American Studies, Educational Psychology
Research areas: Role of the Internet in development; racial/ethnic identity
tynes@illinois.edu

Thomas Weissinger
African American Librarian and Bibliographer and Associate Professor
African American Studies, African American Research Center
Research areas: Black studies bibliography; philosophy of librarianship
tweissin@illinois.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Kevin Franklin, Adjunct Associate Professor, National Center for Supercomputing Applications
James Loewen, Adjunct Professor
Menah Pratt-Clarke, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Equal Opportunity and Access

Zero-Time (0%) Appointments

James Anderson, Professor and Head, Educational Policy Studies
James Barrett, Professor, History
Merle Bowen, Professor and Director, Center for African Studies
Leon Dash, Professor, Journalism
Christopher Fennell, Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Rebecca Ginsburg, Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture
I. Shevon Harvey, Assistant Professor, Kinesiology and Community Health
Mark Leff, Associate Professor, History
Bruce Levine, Professor, History
Cynthia Oliver, Associate Professor, Dance
Laurence Parker, Professor, Educational Policy Studies
Kathy Perkins, Professor, Theatre
F. Adele Proctor, Associate Professor, Speech and Hearing Science
David Roediger, Professor, History
Gabriel Solis, Associate Professor, Music
Siobhan Somerville, Associate Professor, English
David Wilson, Professor, Geography

Departmental Affiliates

Joyce Allen-Smith, Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics
Eyamba Bokamba, Professor, Linguistics
Adrian Burgos, Jr., Associate Professor, History
Jason Chambers, Associate Professor, Advertising
C.L. Cole, Professor, Institute of Communications Research, Gender & Women’s Studies
Ollie Watts Davis, Professor, Music
Violet Harris, Professor, Curriculum and Instruction
John Jennings, Associate Professor, Art and Design
Jocelyn Landrum-Brown, Program Coordinator, Inclusion & Intercultural Relations
Cameron McCarthy, Professor, Educational Policy Studies
Jerry Ogbudimkpa, Health Educator, McKinley Health Center
Elizabeth Pleck, Professor, History
Ernest Scott, Associate Professor, Art and Design
Christopher Span, Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies
William Trent, Professor, Educational Policy Studies
Arlette Willis, Professor, Curriculum and Instruction
Joyce Wright, Associate Professor, Undergraduate Library

Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Associates

Millicent (Amira) Davis
Daniel McClure

Staff

David Ivy, Account Technician
Shirley Olson, Assistant to the Head
Willie Summerville, Campus and Community Affairs Specialist
Lou Turner, Academic Advisor

Welcome to Our New Postdocs
We are pleased to welcome our newly appointed Postdocs for 2010-11, Drs. Daniel McClure and Amira Millicent Davis. Professor McClure comes to us from the Department of African American Studies at University of Massachusetts and Professor Davis is a recent graduate of the Department of Educational Policy Studies right here at University of Illinois.

Recent Faculty Achievements and Honors

Ifeoma Amah: 2010 Illinois Distinguished Dissertation Award, Traditional Category

Jabari Asim: 24th ESSENCE Book Club Recommended Read for “A Taste of Honey”; 2009 Guggenheim Fellowship in Creative Arts; 2009 Distinguished Cultural Award, Association of Blacks in Higher Education

Christopher Benson: Black Excellence Award, African American Arts Alliance of Chicago, non-fiction (Death of Innocence); Outstanding Black Faculty Member, Black Graduate Students Association; Outstanding Teaching in African American Studies, Department of African American Studies

Sundiata Cha-Jua: 2010-2013 Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lectureship Program; Vice President of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS); guest editor of the special issue “Black Political Economy” of The Black Scholar (Winter 2010); composed the introduction for the special issue “Black Political Economy” of The Black Scholar (Winter 2010); 2009 Organization of American Historians EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award

Kevin Franklin: Named one of twelve “People to Watch 2010” in high productivity computing by HPC Wire magazine

Rebecca Ginsburg: 2010 Campus Award for Excellence in Public Engagement

Jennifer Hamer: 2009 Proctor and Gamble Award

Ronald Jackson: 2010 Eastern Communication Association Distinguished Teaching Fellow; editor of Critical Studies in Media Communication; William Gudykunst Memorial Lecture, International Conference on Language and Social Psychology in Brisbane, Australia; Keynote address at the 9th Champaign County-wide Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration, “Embracing Brotherhood: Rising Above Personal Confines.”

Robin Jarrett: Visiting Scholar, Michigan State University

Clarence Lang: “Grassroots at the Gateway” was featured in a 2010 issue of the St. Louis Beacon; Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities Faculty Fellow; Center for Advanced Studies Fellowship Recipient; 2009 Organization of American Historians EBSCOhost America: History and Life Award

James Loewen: “Teaching What Really Happened” was named a finalist for Book of the Year by ForeWard Review

Erik McDuffie: 2009 Arnold O. Beckman Award from the Campus Research Board; Secretary for the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD)

Ruby Mendenhall: 2010 University of Michigan National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID) Postdoctoral Fellowship; 2010 Research Grant from University Housing at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Co-PI); 2010 Public Engagement Grant from the University of Illinois Office of the Vice Chancellor for Public Engagement (Co-PI); 2009 Focal Point Grant for the CDMS Racial Microaggressions Working Group from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate College (Co-PI)

Ray Muhammad: 2010 Public Engagement Grant from the University of Illinois Office of the Vice Chancellor for Public Engagement (Co-PI)

Adlai Murdoch: Special guest editor, Research in African Literatures, Vol. 41 No. 1; composed the editorial introduction for the special issue of Research in African Literatures, Vol. 41 No. 1; composed the editorial introduction for a special issue of International Journal of Francophone Studies, Vol. 11 No.4

Helen Neville: 2010-2013 Associate Provost Fellow; 2009-2010 LAS Faculty Teaching Fellow; 2009 Charles and Shirley Thomas Award for mentoring and contributions to African American students and community, American Psychological Association; 2009 Rockefeller Foundation Residency, Bellagio Center

Brendesha Tynes: 2010 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development grant; Selected as an “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Recent Faculty Publications

Journal Articles
Cha-Jua, S. Guest editor, Special issue, "Black Political Economy," The Black Scholar, Vol. 40, No. 1, (Winter 2010), 64 pages.

Cha-Jua, S. "Introduction To the Special Issue on Black Political Economy: Obama and the Deteriorating Condition of African America," The Black Scholar, Vol. 40, No. 1, (Winter 2010): 2-6.

Cha-Jua, S. "The New Nadir: The Contemporary Black Racial Formation," in special issue, "Black Political Economy," The Black Scholar, Vol. 40, No. 1, (Winter 2010): 38-58.

DeLuca, S., Duncan, G.J., Mendenhall, R., and Keels, M. (2010). Gautreaux Mothers and their Children: An Update. Housing Policy Debate 20 (1): 7-25.

Jarrett, R.L., Jefferson, S.R. & Kelly, J.N. (forthcoming 2010). Finding community in family: Neighborhood effects and African American extended kinship networks. Journal of Comparative Family Studies

McDuffie, E. “The Diasporic Radicalism of Queen Mother Audley Moore and the Origins of Black Power,” African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal Vol. 3, No. 2 (2010), 181—195

Mendenhall, R. (2010). The Political Economy of Black Housing: From the Housing Crisis of the Great Migrations to the Subprime Mortgage Crisis. The Black Scholar 40 (1):20-37.

Mendenhall, R. 2009. Families in the Gautreaux Families Housing Mobility Program: Perceptions and Responses to the U.S. Political Economy. The Review of Black Political Economy 36 (3/4): 197-226.

Murdoch, H.A. “Ars poetica, ars politica: The Double Life of Aimé Césaire,” in special issue, “Aimé Césaire, 1913-2008: Poet, Politician, Cultural Statesman”, Research in African Literatures, Vol. 41, No. 1, (Spring 2010).

Murdoch, H.A. “Glissant’s Opacité and the De-Nationalization of Identity,” forthcoming in special issue on Edouard Glissant, John Drabinski, ed., C.L.R. James Journal, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 2010).

Murdoch, H.A. “Oceanic routes: migrations and métissages in South Pacific literatures and travelogues,” in special issue “Oceanic Routes: Migrations and Métissages in South Pacific Literatures and Travelogues”, International Journal of Francophone Studies, Vol. 11, No. 4 (2009), 481-502.

Murdoch, H.A. “A Legacy of Trauma: Caribbean Slavery, Race, Class and Contemporary Identity in Abeng,” in special issue to Commemorate the Abolition of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Adeleke Adeeko, Paul Tiyambe Zeleza and Natasha Barnes, eds., Research in African Literatures, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Winter 2009), 65-88.

Murdoch, H.A. “Autobiography and Departmentalization in Chamoiseau's Chemin-d'école: Re-presentative Strategies for the Martinican Memoir,” in Research in African Literatures Vol. 40, No. 2 (2009), 16-39.

Book Chapters
Cha-Jua, S. "The Changing Same: Black Racial Formation and Transformation as a Theory of the African American Experience" in Race Struggles (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009), 9-47. ).

Cha-Jua, S. "Struggle: Introduction and Reading Questions to Part 3," chapter in Race Struggles edited by Ted Koditschek, Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, and Helen Neville (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009), 205-10.

Koditschek, T., Cha-Jua, S., and Neville, H. "Introduction," "Conclusion," and "Glossary," chapters in Race Struggles edited by Ted Koditschek, Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, and Helen Neville (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009), vii-xi, 308-316, and 317-23.

Jackson, R. L. (2009).  Mapping cultural communication research: 1960s to the present. In J. Chesebro (Ed.), A Century of Transformation: Studies in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Eastern Communication Association. (pp. 272-292). New York: Oxford University Press.

Lang, C. “Between Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Mason-Dixon Line: A Case Study of Black Freedom Militancy in the Gateway City,” in Theodore Koditschek, Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, and Helen A. Neville, eds., Race Struggles (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009), 231-259.

Lang, C. “Black Power on the Ground: Continuity and Rupture in St. Louis,” in Peniel E. Joseph, ed., Neighborhood Rebels: Black Power at the Local Level (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), 67-89.

McDuffie, E. “‘[N]o small amount of change could do’: Esther Cooper Jackson and the Making of a Black Left Feminist,” in Want to Start a Revolution: Women in the Black Revolt eds. Komozi Woodard, Jeanne Theoharis, and Dayo Gore (Incomplete work under contract to New York University Press)

McDuffie, E. “Black Women’s Freedom as a Global Issue: Esther Cooper Jackson, Black Left Feminism, and the Cold War,” in Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement. 1945-1960: Another Side of the Story, ed. Robbie Liberman and Clarence Lang (New York: Palgrave, 2009): 81-114.

McDuffie, E. “Esther V. Cooper’s ‘The Negro Woman Domestic Worker in Relation to Trade Unionism’: Black Left Feminism and the Popular Front,” in Red Activists and Black Freedom: James and Esther Jackson and the Long Civil Rights Movement, ed. David Levering Lewis and Daniel J. Leab (New York: Routledge, 2010): 33-40.

Books and Monographs
Asim, J. A Taste of Honey: Stories. Broadway Books, March 2010.

Asim, J. Boy of Mine. Little, Brown Publishers, April 2010.

Asim, J. Girl of Mine. Little, Brown Publishers, April 2010.

Jackson, R. (ed.). Encyclopedia of Identity (two volumes). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 1000
pages.

Koditschek, T., Cha-Jua, S. and Neville, H. (eds.). Race Struggles. University of Illinois Press, Fall 2009, 352 pages.

Lang, C. Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75 (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009).

Lieberman, R. and Lang, C., eds., Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement: “Another Side of the Story” (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Book Reviews
Cha-Jua, S. The Selma of the North: Civil Rights Insurgency in Milwaukee. By Patrick D. Jones. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009). The Journal of American History, Vol. 96, No. 4, (March 2010): 150.

Cha-Jua, S. The St. Louis African American Community and the Exodusters. By Bryan M. Jack (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2008). American Historical Review, Vol. 114, No. 3, (October 2010): 1091.

Cha-Jua, S. American Pogrom: The East St. Louis Race Riot and Black Politics. By Charles L. Lumpkins. (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2008). Journal of African American History Vol. 94, No. 2, (Spring 2009): 287-90.

Cha-Jua, S. American Pogrom: The East St. Louis Race Riot and Black Politics. By Charles L. Lumpkins. (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2008). Journal of Illinois History Vol. 12, No. 3, (Autumn 2009): 244-46.

Faculty Ranked as Excellent by UIUC Students

Spring 2009
Robin Jarrett (AFRO 495)
Clarence Lang (AFRO 550)
Erik McDuffie (AFRO 342)
Ruby Mendenhall (AFRO 490)
Menah Pratt-Clarke (AFRO 498).

Fall 2009
Christopher Benson (AFRO 410)
Robin Jarrett (AFRO 398)
Erik McDuffie (AFRO 298)

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